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EECU is now accepting applications for the Glenn Mandeville Memorial Scholarship program for high school seniors. If you, your child or someone you know is preparing for graduation this year and meets the criteria below, download an application and submit it by January 31, 2017, at any EECU office or by mail.

In order to be considered:

  • Applicant must be a high school senior
  • Applicant must be a member in good standing with EECU or parent/legal guardian must be a member in good standing with EECU
  • Applicant must express on their application their intended course of study
  • Recipient of scholarship funds must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.5 to receive annual distribution of funds
  • The scholarship must be used for the purpose of study at an accredited college or university
  • Academic achievement, character, leadership and personal recommendations will be considered in the selection of scholarship recipients
  • Applicant must include all required documentation and transcripts

The scholarship committee will select six recipients – three who are seeking a career in education and three who are pursuing other areas of study – to receive $5,000 in funds. See application for full details and instructions.

If you’re new to budgeting, figuring out how to manage your money each month can feel overwhelming. Not only do you need to organize, but you also have to make difficult decisions about how to spend your cash. Relying on the experiences of others can help only so much, because your income and expenses are unique. Someone may be able to spend $2,000 per month on rent in Arlington, VA, but that kind of spending may not work for you.

But there’s good news: You don’t need complicated spreadsheets with countless spending categories, and you don’t need to be a financial expert to understand how much money you can spend. You simply need to follow the 50-20-30 Rule.

What is the 50-20-30 Rule?

The 50-20-30 Rule helps you build a budget by using three spending categories:

  • 50% of your income should go to living expenses and essentials. This includes your rent, utilities, and things like groceries and transportation for work.
  • 20% of your income should go to financial goals, meaning your savings, investments, and debt-reduction payments (if you have debt, such as credit card payments).
  • 30% of your income should be used for flexible spending. This is everything you buy that you want but don’t necessarily need (like money spent on movies and travel).

Keep in mind that the percentages for essentials and flexible spending are the maximum you should spend. Falling under those guidelines can leave more money for other financial goals.

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How to start a 50-20-30 budget

Figure out what’s currently happening with your finances. First, look at your pay stubs to determine exactly how much money you bring home each month. That’s your income and what you’ll base your 50-20-30 split on. (If you’re self-employed, be careful to track your earnings and understand your average income per month so you can budget accordingly.)

Next, track your spending. Yes, that means keeping up with every last cent, from the big stuff such as rent to the coffee that you grab on the way to work. Then divide your spending into one of the three categories: essentials, financial goals, and flexible spending. From here, adjust your spending to ensure you’re falling into the 50-20-30 parameters. If you’re overspending on stuff you want but don’t need, it’s time to cut back to save more.

Why the 50-20-30 Rule works

It keeps your personal finances simple so you can pay your bills, add to your savings, and have the freedom to use some money just for fun. It’s also a good starting point for the budgeting novice. There’s no uncertainty, your action steps are clear, and it even provides for savings, investments, and other financial goals. This makes it much more likely that you’ll stay the course over time, ultimately reaching your desired financial stability.

The 50-20-30 Rule also offers some flexibility. You can bend it a bit by altering the percentages to make it work better for you. “It’s not about the exact percentage breakdown, because all budgets will be slightly different,” says Eric Roberge, a financial planner who specializes in helping professionals and entrepreneurs at Beyond Your Hammock. “The key is to take action and use a system to help you stay consistent in managing your money every month, and making sure you’re covering your expenses, being responsible by saving for tomorrow, and giving yourself some room to enjoy life today.”

– Published by Forbes on June 11, 2016

angeltree

Thanks to EECU employees and members, underprivileged Fort Worth children from 80 elementary schools will be celebrating the holidays with presents. Starting Thanksgiving week, please stop by the Fort Worth branch at 1617 W. 7th Street in Fort Worth to pick an “angel” from the lobby Christmas tree.  All the angels have been identified by their school counselors as disadvantaged.

Some important program details:

  • All gifts should be returned to the Fort Worth Branch at 1617 W. 7th Street by December 15
  • Gifts should be wrapped and tagged with the angel’s number that is on the tag you choose from the tree. Please be sure to log your name and phone number on the form in the Angel Tree book next to the Christmas tree
  • And, finally it is nice to provide articles of clothing and a few toys – remembering this may be the only Christmas gift your angel might get!

If you can’t make it into the branch to select your angel, please contact Donna Thomas at 817-882-0160 or community@eecu.org and she will be glad to find an angel for you.

EECU has been a Christmas angel for Fort Worth Independent School District children via this program for 25 years.  Thank you for brightening the lives of our neighbors in need.

TAFB-Food-Drive

Tarrant Area Food Bank provides nearly 2 million meals each month across 12 counties surrounding Fort Worth through the donations of generous people and businesses. EECU supports this cause each year through a food drive.

Now through December 16, bring non-perishable food items to any EECU branch to donate to our annual food drive. All donations will be delivered to Tarrant Area Food Bank immediately following the drive, and we want to wow them with the generosity of our donors.

Annual Food Drive Pounds of Food Donated
2016 Goal: 3,800
2015 3,600+
2014 1,500+
2013 1,300+
2012 769
2011 818
Most Requested Food Items
  • Canned Meats (Tuna, Chicken, Ham, etc.)
  • Canned Fruit
  • Canned Vegetables
  • Peanut Butter (no glass jars)
  • Dried Beans
  • Cereal
  • Boxed Pastas
  • Rice
  • Boxed or canned soups
  • Boxed or canned juices

List of Accepted Items (Non-Perishable Only)